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Book Description

First edition, 1842. Signed by William Morris on the front free endpaper. Label to front pastedoown “From the Library of Kelmscott House, Hammersmith”. Hardback. xvi, 546pp plus publisher’s ads at end. No jacket. Brown cloth binding with teal coloured boards and printed paper label to spine. This book offered the first presentation of the collection of poetry from the Exeter Cathedral manuscript with parallel Old English and English texts (translated by Benjamin Thorpe). The manuscript was presented to the Cathedral by Leofric, the first bishop of Exeter, under whom the see was transferred to Exeter from Crediton, where he was the tenth bishop, in 1046. The Exeter manuscript contains some of the most notable examples of Anglo-Saxon poetry including “The Legend of St Guthlac”, “The Phoenix”, “The Wanderer”, “The Seafarer” and some of the famous riddles. The book has two printed book plates to the front pastedown: one is of a John Charrington, Shenley and the other is that of the late Eric Gerald Stanley. Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon in the University of Oxford, succeeding JRR Tolkien in that role.
Author Thorpe, Benjamin
Date 1842
Binding Hardback
Publisher Wm. Pickering for The Society of Antiquaries
Condition Very good condition. Repair to spine with original laid on. Some wear to board edges. Light toning to title page, ads page at rear & slightly to page edges. A few small nicks to page edges. Overall a very clean and bright copy.
Pages xvi, 546

Price: £2500.00

Offered by Ariadne Books

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