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Book Description
A varied collection of designs for brooches, bracelets and buckles, set with diamonds, sapphires, jade and coral from the studio of P. Cavezana (joaillier fabricant). We have not been able to identify the designer but he probably worked close by to the great jewellers houses of the rue de la Paix and the Place Vendôme in Paris during the 1920s and 30s. This was interesting time for Jewellery for the designs reflect the transition from post war riches int the the aftermath of the great depression of the 1930s. ‘It was then that the characteristic Art Deco palette of tango (orange-red), ultramarine, eau de Nil (a pale green), buttercup, lavender, and black made its first appearance in jewellery, expressed in enamel, lacquer, or a variety of such materials as jade, ivory, lapis lazuli, stained agate, onyx, or jet, with the distinctive tango represented by coral or cornelian. Many of the jewels that are associated with the 1920s-the bandeaux, the plumed aigrettes, the long tasselled neckchains, and pendulous earrings-were already established fashions before World War I. Jewels were designed to sway with the body in time to the rhythms of the tango and the Charleston: Oriental fashions took an even firmer hold in the 1920s. Jewels were set with carved precious stones from India and Chinese jades. The Parisian firms of Lacloche, Cartier, and Boucheron led the field at this time. The trend towards simplicity and formality became crystallized in the abstract geometrical designs of Jean Fouquet (1899-1984), Raymond Templier (1891-1968), Gérard Sandoz (1902-95), Jean Desprès (1889-1980), and Georges Fouquet (1862-1957). In 1929, the year of the Wall Street crash, attitudes to jewellery changed, making it a focal point on the costume rather than a complement to the body. Neck chains and aigrettes were out, and long pendent earrings were replaced by compact earclips. Two new styles emerged, both fixed to the dress rather than the person: the plaque brooch, which was exactly what its name suggests, and the clip, secured by clamping it to the neckline or lapel. It was the age of the gadget, and clips were often made in pairs so that the two could be united in a single ‘double-clip’ brooch or even a bracelet. Jewellery tended to be large and impressive, a symbol of security in an insecure age. Oriental fashions held their own, dominated by Chinese style. The geometrical style manifested itself in the hooked and stepped decoration of Aztec Mexico and in the mechanistic cocktail jewellery of the 1940s. [The Grove Encyclopaedia of Decorative Arts].
Author [JEWELLERY DESIGNS]. [CAVEZANA, P.].
Date [1925-1935].
Binding contained in a modern cloth box with black label lettered in gilt.
Publisher [France:]
Condition 211 sheets of pale green handmade thick paper [80 x 120mm] each with a design in pencil white and coloured inks; each design with a reference number;

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